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Hunters in Poland and Norway under attack: it’s time to act

It seems that Poland is about to pass a new hunting law that will forbid boys under 18 to participate in hunting activities, while Norway is to ban some semi-automatic hunting rifles without any compensation - those who already own the “prohibited” guns will have three years to scrap or sell them.

Let’s start with Poland:

As Jens Ulik Høgh, a professional supporter of hunters’ interests writes on his Facebook profile, the new Polish hunting law that will forbid children to participate in hunting activities “is a violation of basic human rights”

Hunter with shotgun
Hunting gives a lot of knowledge about nature and a deep understanding of life and death.

Citing the European Convention on Human Rights (“The State shall respect the right of parents to ensure such education and teaching in conformity with their own religious and philosophical convictions”) Høgh stresses that hunting gives children ”a lot of knowledge about nature and a deep understanding of life and death. It is good for their mental and physical development. It teaches them responsibility. I consider it very healthy in the broadest sense of the word. I also think that it is my fundamental right as a parent to educate my children according to my own beliefs.” That’s why he and other Polish hunters have written to the Polish President, Andrzej Duda, asking him to reject the law proposal. But time is running out: Duda is supposed to sign the new law on Friday, March 23th.

Then there’s Norway:

At present only a number of semi-automatic rifles are allowed in Norway for hunting. It’s not clear which of them will be banned or what will be the criteria: what is certain is that the Ruger Mini rifles will be banned.

This is a de facto retroactive ban on hunting weapons, and what’s worse without compensation. Since selling the newly-prohibited rifles abroad will be actually impossible, law-abiding Norwegian gun-owners will be obliged to scrap them, consequently suffering economic damage.

It’s hard to understand the rationale behind such oplophobic proposals. Especially because Norway is not even an EU member and Poland recently joined the Czech Republic against the notorious EU “Gun Ban”. 

Hunter in Lapland
Any attack on the rights a single national group of gun-owners is an attack on the entire European gun-owners community.

Certainly, these law changes are driven by some kind of “political correctness”. Nevertheless, it should be clear that any attack on the rights a single national group of gun-owners is an attack on the entire European gun-owners community. As in the “boiling frog” fable, little by little anti-gun ideology is eroding everyone’s freedom and reducing citizens to subjects. 


03.20.18

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